the highest tide the highest tide moon

A combination of the highest tides and geography cause the largest tidal bores. This tidal bore occurs at Tidal View Farm 3 hours after low tide in Hantsport. The tidal bore arrives at the Herbert River Bridge 3 hours 45 minutes after low tide at Hantsport.

Tidal Bore.

The Tidal Bore occurs as the incoming tide "works its way" up a river which is flowing downstream to the sea. The following photo shows the tidal bore of the incoming tide as it advances against the current of the natural flow of the river.

Tidal Bore in Herbert River

This photo (above) shows the Herbert River "flowing" to the sea from the bottom left hand side of the photo. The Tidal Bore is moving upstream against the flow of the river. It is flowing from the upper right hand side of the photo and is being pushed by the incoming tide against the flow of the river. The photo below is taken just a few moments later and a few feet upstream from the last photo. This photo clearly shows the "struggle" of the currents. The current of a flowing river is greater at the larger side of a curve than at the smaller side. Evidence of this can be seen in the photo below. Clearly it has pushed through the incoming tidal bore at that point. The photo also shows the turbulence cause by the opposing currents. Further, the wave pattern behind the Tidal Bore is modified by the interaction with the energy of the opposing river flow.

Tidal Bore in Herbert River

St. Croix Tidal Bore

This series of photos of a tidal bore on the St. Croix River was taken at the "Tidal View Farm". The event was part of an Elderhostel (www.elderhostel.com) Program on the World's Highest Tides out of Wolfville, Nova Scotia. "Tidal View Farm" was a passion of Elliot Church, a former owner of the property, who enriched the lives of tens of thousands whom he coached and who were "touched" by the magnitude of the incoming tidal bores at his property. Elliot's dream of making this property a Nova Scotia tourism resource was realized. Tidal Elderhostel Programs are not offered out of Wolfville at the present. The Tidal Bore can also be viewed from a viewing area a few miles away from a viewing area incorporated at a new bridge over the Herbert River as will be seen by the Elderhostel Group in photos to follow. The photo above shows the group heading through the Tidal View Farm field to be in a better position to experience the Tidal Bore. In the photo below they are awaiting the first glimpse of the Tidal Bore.

St. Croix Tidal Bore

The Tidal Bore makes its appearance from the upper right bend in the St. Croix River.

St. Croix Tidal Bore

St. Croix Tidal Bore

The Tidal Bore advances into the large flat area in the St. Croix River bed.

St. Croix Tidal Bore

In this photo the Tidal Bore wave front has spread out to cover a large area of the wide river bed.

St. Croix Tidal Bore

The Tidal Bore advances through the outer curve of the river bed as it is deeper than the centre. the reason that it is deeper is that the water flowing (in elther direction) has the most energy near the outer part of the circle. This higher energy not only makes the river deeper in this area but also "erodes" the river bank and hence is the phenomenon which results in the meandering of rivers.

St. Croix Tidal Bore

This photo shows the tidal bore at the left of the photo. The larger volume of the incoming tidal water is also shown to to the right of the photo. It is also arriving in waves.

St. Croix Tidal Bore

The above photo shows the complex waves pushing the Tidal Bore into the quiet flow of the St. Croix river which is flowing in the oposite direction to the incoming tidal water.

St. Croix River Tidal Bore

The upper photo shows that the incoming tidal water has almost completely filled this area of the river. The lower photo gives an idea of the magnitude of the basin filled by the incoming tide in a period of less than 15 minutes.

St. Croix River Tidal Bore

As the Tidal Bore proceeds up the St Croix River it reaches the mouth of the Herbert River, a tributary of the St. Croix River. The Tidal Bore divides and, pushed by the incoming tide from the Bay of Fundy's Minas Basin, heads up both rivers. There's a bridge where Hyw 236 crosses the Herbert River. It is the scene of the next series of photos. These photos are of the same Tidal Bore. They are taken about 40 minutes or so after the the last of the previous set of photos taken at Tidal View Farm.

Tidal Bore Tidal View Farm

The photo above shows the group from the photos at Tidal View Farm, relocated and waiting for the approaching Tidal Bore to come around the bend of the Herbert River. The two photos which follow show the arrival of the Tidal Bore. The unconcerned cattle in the background are enjoying the lush spring grass.

Tidal Bore Tidal View Farm

Tidal Bore Tidal View Farm

Autumn is a great season to view the Tidal phemonema of the Bay of Fundy. The photo below shows an autumn Tidal Bore approaching the Hwy 236 bridge over the Herbert River.

Tidal Bore Herbert River Bridge

The photo below shows a group watching this Tidal Bore from the viewing area built into this bridge.

Tidal Bore Herbert River Bridge

Text by Jim Laceby